Stages of development 5 - 8 years

The change in a growing child’s coordination during the first eight years of life is remarkable.  From a baby whose hand, leg and arm movements are completely disorganised, they turn into a child who can throw and catch a ball, hold a pencil and draw with it and even ride a bike.

5 – 6 years

Gross: By this age the child moves around independently and is able to negotiate any obstacles in her path.  She manages climbing frames and small ladders.

Fine: She holds scissors properly and cuts paper with them.  She may be able to write one or two letters which appear in her name.

Physical Stages of development

  • Weight about 19.5 kg
  • Height about 107cm
  • Is agile and energetic
  • Rides tricycle/ scooter skilfully
  • Can dress and undress without assistance
  • Sleeps about 10 hours in 24
  • Draws people, houses, aeroplanes and vehicles recognisably
  • Can run, skip, climb, dance, jump, swing, throw a ball and catch fairly well, build with big boxes, planks, barrels

Emotions and Feelings

  • Self confident
  • Boasts, shows off, threatens but also shows friendliness and generosity
  • Shows desire to excel and can be persistent and purposeful in learning new skill
  • Shows good degree of control of emotions and on the whole is stable

Social behaviour

  • Vocabulary can be up to 3000 words
  • Asks many questions
  • Often content to play alone for long periods, mastering a skill, but also plays with other children, especially in building and imaginative play.
  • Prefers games of rivalry to team games
  • Group games often need adults to arbitrate
  • May be nervous of older children in playground
  • Basically dependent on adults – teachers and parents- need their approval
  • Enjoys stories about strong powerful people.

7 – 8 years

Physical Stages of development

  • Active and energetic 
  • All physical pursuits becoming popular 
  • Can walk along narrow planks, balance on poles, use bats and balls well
  • Dances with pleasure
  • Enjoys physical education at school
  • Loses first teeth

Emotions and feelings

  • Independent and may be solitary for short periods
  • Self critical
  • May be moody and dissatisfied at times but gradually becomes more self-reliant and steadier in all emotional expression.
  • Fact usually distinguished from fantasy
  • Lacks control of his own energy and will become tired and irritable

Social behaviour

  • Reads a lot and enjoys writing own stories
  • Watches television with comprehension and appreciation
  • Depends less on adults except for specific help in work
  • Mae believe play becoming dramatic play
  • Can play and carry out projects with other children but still needs some arbitration by respected adults 

Cognition

  • Beginning to use symbols in head and manipulate them there instead of having to do e.g. instead of putting bricks into a box the child can imagine doing this
  • New skills are being gained at school, e.g. reading and writing and simple numerical skills involving addition and subtraction.

8 years plus

Physical Stages of development

  • Period of great agility and vitality
  • All physical activities carried out with increasing coordination
  • Games requiring exactness such as hopscotch, conkers, skipping etc. are increasing popular
  • Increase in group wrestling and skirmishing
  • Energy tends to flag suddenly but a short rest and food restores it easily

Emotions and feelings

  • Emotionally independent of adults to a great extent
  • Need for acceptance by peers
  • Deep satisfaction in intellectual pursuits
  • Joy and delight in physical prowess and skill
  • Usually good control of emotions except in mob situations
  • Anxiety aroused by ineffectual adult management of environment

Social behaviour

  • Membership of group of own age very important
  • Individual desires submerged for benefit of the group
  • Boys and girls mix fairly well but as time goes on sexes tend to separate

Cognition

  • Developing more confidence in reasoning skills. 
  • Conversation is mastered
  • Can think forwards and backwards i.e. is able to add and subtract in her head and not only on paper

 

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